Sullivan Auto Trading New Dealership in Fredericksburg, VA

Trump Didn’t Kill the Global Trade System. He Split It in Two.

This article is taken from the Wall Street Journal written about nine months ago and sits behind a a paywall, so I decided to copy and paste it here. This article explains Trump's policies toward global trade and what has actually happened so far. I think the article does a decent job of explaining the Trade War. While alot has happenedsince the article was written, I still think its relevant.
However, what is lacking in the article, like many articles on the trade war, is it doesn't really explain the history of US trade policy, the laws that the US administration is using to place tariffs on China and the official justification for the US President in enacting tariffs against China. In my analysis I will cover those points.

SUMMARY

When Trump entered the White House people feared he would dismantle the global system the US and its allies had built over the last 75 years, but he hasn't. He has realign into two systems. One between the US and its allies which looks similar to the one built since the 1980s with a few of quota and tariffs. As the article points out
Today, Korus and Nafta have been replaced by updated agreements(one not yet ratified) that look much like the originals. South Korea accepted quotas on steel. Mexico and Canada agreed to higher wages, North American content requirements and quotas for autos. Furthermore, the article points out Douglas Irwin, an economist and trade historian at Dartmouth College, calls these results the “status quo with Trumpian tweaks: a little more managed trade sprinkled about for favored industries. It’s not good, but it’s not the destruction of the system.” Mr. Trump’s actions so far affect only 12% of U.S. imports, according to Chad Bown of the Peterson Institute for International Economics. In 1984, 21% of imports were covered by similar restraints, many imposed by Mr. Reagan, such as on cars, steel, motorcycles and clothing. Protectionist instincts go so far in the US, there are strong lobby groups for both protectionist and freetrade in the US.
The second reflects a emerging rivalry between the US and China. Undo some of the integration that followed China accession to the WTO. Two questions 1) How far is the US willing to decouple with China 2) Can it persuade allies to join.
The second is going to be difficult because China's economic ties are greater than they were between the Soviets, and China isn't waging an ideological struggle. Trump lacks Reagan commitment to alliance and free trade. The status quo with China is crumbling Dan Sullivan, a Republican senator from Alaska, personifies these broader forces reshaping the U.S. approach to the world. When Mr. Xi visited the U.S. in 2015, Mr. Sullivan urged his colleagues to pay more attention to China’s rise. On the Senate floor, he quoted the political scientist Graham Allison: “War between the U.S. and China is more likely than recognized at the moment.” Last spring, Mr. Sullivan went to China and met officials including Vice President Wang Qishan. They seemed to think tensions with the U.S. will fade after Mr. Trump leaves the scene, Mr. Sullivan recalled. “I just said, ‘You are completely misreading this.’” The mistrust, he told them, is bipartisan, and will outlast Mr. Trump. both Bush II and Obama tried to change dialogue and engagement, but by the end of his term, Obama was questioning the approach. Trump has declared engagement. “We don’t like it when our allies steal our ideas either, but it’s a much less dangerous situation,” said Derek Scissors, a China expert at the American Enterprise Institute whose views align with the administration’s more hawkish officials. “We’re not worried about the war-fighting capability of Japan and Korea because they’re our friends.”
The article also points out unlike George Kennan in 1946 who made a case for containing the Soviet Union, the US hasn't explicitly made a case for containing the Soviets, Trump's administration hasn't, because as the the article explains its divided Michael Pillsbury a Hudson Institute scholar close to the Trump team, see 3 scenarios
Pillsbury thinks the third is most likely to happen, even though the administration hasn't said that it has adopted that policy. The US is stepping efforts to draw in other trading partners. The US, EU and Japan have launched a WTO effort to crack down on domestic subsidies and technology transfers requirement. US and Domestic concerns with prompted some countries to restrict Huawei. The US is also seeking to walloff China from other trade deals. However, there are risk with this strategy

ARTICLE

Trump Didn’t Kill the Global Trade System. He Split It in Two.

INTRODUCTION

My main criticism of this article is it tries like the vast majority of articles to fit US trade actions in the larger context of US geopolitical strategy. Even the author isn't certain "The first goes to the heart of Mr. Trump’s goal. If his aim is to hold back China’s advance, economists predict he will fail.". If you try to treat the trade "war" and US geopolitical strategy toward China as one, you will find yourself quickly frustrated and confused. If you treat them separately with their different set of stakeholders and histories, were they intersect with regards to China, but diverge. During the Cold War, trade policy toward the Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc was subordinated to geopolitical concerns. For Trump, the trade issues are more important than geopolitical strategy. His protectionist trade rhetoric has been fairly consistent since 1980s. In his administration, the top cabinet members holding economic portfolios, those of Commerce, Treasury and US Trade Representative are the same people he picked when he first took office. The Director of the Economic Council has changed hands once, its role isn't as important as the National Security Advisor. While State, Defense, CIA, Homeland Security, UN Ambassador, National Security Advisor have changed hands at least once. Only the Director of National Intelligence hasn't changed.
International Trade makes up 1/4 of the US economy, and like national security its primarily the responsibility of the Federal government. States in the US don't implement their own tariffs. If you add the impact of Treasury policy and how it relates to capital flows in and out of the US, the amounts easily exceed the size of the US economy. Furthermore, because of US Dollar role as the reserve currency and US control of over global system the impact of Treasury are global. Trade policy and investment flows runs through two federal departments Commerce and Treasury and for trade also USTR. Defense spending makes up 3.3% of GDP, and if you add in related homeland security its at most 4%. Why would anyone assume that these two realms be integrated let alone trade policy subordinate to whims of a national security bureaucracy in most instances? With North Korea or Iran, trade and investment subordinate themselves to national security, because to Treasury and Commerce bureaucrats and their affiliated interest groups, Iran and the DPRK are well, economic midgets, but China is a different matter.
The analysis will be divided into four sections. The first will be to provide a brief overview of US trade policy since 1914. The second section will discuss why the US is going after China on trade issues, and why the US has resorted using a bilateral approach as opposed to going through the WTO. The third section we will talk about how relations with China is hashed out in the US.
The reason why I submitted this article, because there aren't many post trying to explain US-China Trade War from a trade perspective. Here is a post titled "What is the Reasons for America's Trade War with China, and not one person mentioned Article 301 or China's WTO Commitments. You get numerous post saying that Huawei is at heart of the trade war. Its fine, but if you don't know what was inside the USTR Investigative report that lead to the tariffs. its like skipping dinner and only having dessert When the US President, Donald J Trump, says he wants to negotiate a better trade deal with other countries, and has been going on about for the last 35 years, longer than many of you have been alive, why do people think that the key issues with China aren't primarily about trade at the moment.

OVERVIEW OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE ORIENTATION

Before 1940s, the US could be categorized as a free market protectionist economy. For many this may seem like oxymoron, how can an economy be free market and protectionist? In 1913, government spending made up about 7.5% of US GDP, in the UK it was 13%, and for Germany 18% (Public Spending in the 20th Century A Global Perspective: Ludger Schuknecht and Vito Tanzi - 2000). UK had virtual zero tariffs, while for manufactured goods in France it was 20%, 13% Germany, 9% Belgium and 4% Netherlands. For raw materials and agricultural products, it was almost zero. In contrast, for the likes of United States, Russia and Japan it was 44%, 84% and 30% respectively. Even though in 1900 United States was an economic powerhouse along with Germany, manufactured exports only made up 30% of exports, and the US government saw tariffs as exclusively a domestic policy matter and didn't see tariffs as something to be negotiated with other nations. The US didn't have the large constituency to push the government for lower tariffs abroad for their exports like in Britain in the 1830-40s (Reluctant Partners: A History of Multilateral Trade Cooperation, 1850-2000).
The Underwood Tariffs Act of 1913 which legislated the income tax, dropped the tariffs to 1850 levels levels.Until 16th amendment was ratified in 1913 making income tax legal, all US federal revenue came from excise and tariffs. In contrast before 1914, about 50% of UK revenue came from income taxes. The reason for US reluctance to introduced income tax was ideological and the United State's relative weak government compared to those in Europe. After the First World War, the US introduced the Emergency Tariff Act of 1921, than the Fordney–McCumber Tariff of 1922 followed by a Smoot-Hawley Act of 1930. Contrary to popular opinion, the Smoot-Hawley Act of 1930 had a small negative impact on the economy, since imports and exports played a small part of the US economy, and the tariffs were lower than the average that existed from 1850-1914.
Immediately after the Second World War, when the US economy was the only industrialized economy left standing, the economic focus was on rehabilitation and monetary stability. There was no grandiose and ideological design. Bretton Woods system linked the US dollar to gold to create monetary stability, and to avoid competitive devaluation and tariffs that plagued the world economy after Britain took itself off the gold in 1931. The US$ was the natural choice, because in 1944 2/3 of the world's gold was in the US. One reason why the Marshall Plan was created was to alleviate the chronic deficits Europeans countries had with the US between 1945-50. It was to rebuild their economies so they could start exports good to the US. Even before it was full implemented in 1959, it was already facing problems, the trade surpluses that the US was running in the 1940s, turned to deficits as European and Japanese economies recovered. By 1959, Federal Reserves foreign liabilities had already exceeded its gold reserves. There were fears of a run on the US gold supply and arbitrage. A secondary policy of the Bretton woods system was curbs on capital outflows to reduce speculation on currency pegs, and this had a negative impact on foreign investment until it was abandoned in 1971. It wasn't until the 1980s, where foreign investment recovered to levels prior to 1914. Factoring out the big spike in global oil prices as a result of the OPEC cartel, it most likely wasn't until the mid-1990s that exports as a % of GDP had reached 1914 levels.
Until the 1980s, the US record regarding free trade and markets was mediocre. The impetus to remove trade barriers in Europe after the Second World War was driven by the Europeans themselves. The EEC already had a custom union in 1968, Canada and the US have yet to even discuss implementing one. Even with Canada it took the US over 50 years to get a Free Trade Agreement. NAFTA was inspired by the success of the EEC. NAFTA was very much an elite driven project. If the Americans put the NAFTA to a referendum like the British did with the EEC in the seventies, it most likely wouldn't pass. People often look at segregation in the US South as a political issue, but it was economic issue as well. How could the US preach free trade, when it didn't have free trade in its own country. Segregation was a internal non-tariff barrier. In the first election after the end of the Cold War in 1992, Ross Perot' based most of independent run for the Presidency on opposition to NAFTA. He won 19% of the vote. Like Ross Perot before him, Donald Trump is not the exception in how America has handled tariffs since the founding of the Republic, but more the norm.
The embrace of free trade by the business and political elite can be attributed to two events. After the end of Bretton Woods in 1971, a strong vested interest in the US in the form of multinationals and Wall Street emerged advocating for removal of tariffs and more importantly the removal of restrictions on free flow of capital, whether direct foreign investment in portfolio investment. However, the political class embrace of free trade and capital only really took off after the collapse of the Soviet Union propelled by Cold War triumphalism.
As mentioned by the article, the US is reverting back to a pre-WTO relations with China. As Robert Lighthizer said in speech in 2000
I guess my prescription, really, is to move back to more of a negotiating kind of a settlement. Return to WTO and what it really was meant to be. Something where you have somebody make a decision but have it not be binding.
The US is using financial and legal instruments developed during the Cold War like its extradition treaties (with Canada and Europe), and Section 301. Here is a very good recent article about enforcement commitment that China will make.‘Painful’ enforcement ahead for China if trade war deal is reached with US insisting on unilateral terms
NOTE: It is very difficult to talk about US-China trade war without a basic knowledge of global economic history since 1914. What a lot of people do is politicize or subordinate the economic history to the political. Some commentators think US power was just handed to them after the Second World War, when the US was the only industrialized economy left standing. The dominant position of the US was temporary and in reality its like having 10 tonnes of Gold sitting in your house, it doesn't automatically translate to influence. The US from 1945-1989 was slowly and gradually build her influence in the non-Communist world. For example, US influence in Canada in the 1960s wasn't as strong as it is now. Only 50% of Canadian exports went to the US in 1960s vs 80% at the present moment.

BASIS OF THE US TRADE DISCUSSION WITH CHINA

According to preliminary agreement between China and the US based on unnamed sources in the Wall Street Journal article US, China close in on Trade Deal. In this article it divides the deal in two sections. The first aspects have largely to do with deficits and is political.
As part of a deal, China is pledging to help level the playing field, including speeding up the timetable for removing foreign-ownership limitations on car ventures and reducing tariffs on imported vehicles to below the current auto tariff of 15%. Beijing would also step up purchases of U.S. goods—a tactic designed to appeal to President Trump, who campaigned on closing the bilateral trade deficit with China. One of the sweeteners would be an $18 billion natural-gas purchase from Cheniere Energy Inc., people familiar with the transaction said.
The second part will involve the following.
  1. Commitment Regarding Industrial Policy
  2. Provisions to protect IP
  3. Mechanism which complaints by US companies can be addressed
  4. Bilateral meetings adjudicate disputes. If talks don't produce agreement than US can raise tariffs unilaterally
This grouping of conditions is similar to the points filled under the 301 investigation which serve the basis for initiating the tariffs. I have been reading some sources that say this discussion on this second group of broader issues could only be finalized later
The official justifications for placing the tariffs on Chinese goods is found under the March 2018 investigation submitted by the office of the President to Congress titled FINDINGS OF THE INVESTIGATION INTO CHINA’S ACTS, POLICIES, AND PRACTICES RELATED TO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, AND INNOVATION UNDER SECTION 301 OF THE TRADE ACT OF 1974. From this investigation the United States Trade Representative (USTR) place US Tariffs on Chinese goods as per Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974. Here is a press release by the USTR listing the reasons for placing tariffs, and the key section from the press release. Specifically, the Section 301 investigation revealed:
In the bigger context of trade relations between US and China, China is not honoring its WTO commitments, and the USTR issued its yearly report to Congress in early February about the status of China compliance with its WTO commitments. The points that served as a basis for applying Section 301, also deviate from her commitments as Clinton's Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky paving the way for a trade war. Barshefsky argues that China's back sliding was happening as early as 2006-07, and believes the trade war could have been avoided has those commitments been enforced by previous administrations.
I will provide a brief overview of WTO membership and China's process of getting into the WTO.
WTO members can be divided into two groups, first are countries that joined in 1995-97, and were members of GATT, than there are the second group that joined after 1997. China joined in 2001. There is an argument that when China joined in 2001, she faced more stringent conditions than other developing countries that joined before, because the vast majority of developing countries were members of GATT, and were admitted to the WTO based on that previous membership in GATT. Here is Brookings Institute article published in 2001 titled "Issues in China’s WTO Accession"
This question is all the more puzzling because the scope and depth of demands placed on entrants into the formal international trading system have increased substantially since the formal conclusion of the Uruguay Round of trade negotiations in 1994, which expanded the agenda considerably by covering many services, agriculture, intellectual property, and certain aspects of foreign direct investment. Since 1994, the international community has added agreements covering information technology, basic telecommunications services, and financial services. WTO membership now entails liberalization of a much broader range of domestic economic activity, including areas that traditionally have been regarded by most countries as among the most sensitive, than was required of countries entering the WTO’s predecessor organization the GATT.
The terms of China’s protocol of accession to the World Trade Organization reflect the developments just described and more. China’s market access commitments are much more far-reaching than those that governed the accession of countries only a decade ago. And, as a condition for membership, China was required to make protocol commitments that substantially exceed those made by any other member of the World Trade Organization, including those that have joined since 1995. The broader and deeper commitments China has made inevitably will entail substantial short-term economic costs.
What are the WTO commitments Barshefsky goes on about? When countries join the WTO, particularly those countries that weren't members of GATT and joined after 1997, they have to work toward fulfilling certain commitments. There are 4 key documents when countries make an accession to WTO membership, the working party report, the accession protocol paper, the goods schedule and service schedule.
In the working party report as part of the conclusion which specifies the commitment of each member country what they will do in areas that aren't compliant with WTO regulations on the date they joined. The problem there is no good enforcement mechanism for other members to force China to comply with these commitments. And WTO punishments are weak.
Here is the commitment paragraph for China
"The Working Party took note of the explanations and statements of China concerning its foreign trade regime, as reflected in this Report. The Working Party took note of the commitments given by China in relation to certain specific matters which are reproduced in paragraphs 18-19, 22-23, 35-36, 40, 42, 46-47, 49, 60, 62, 64, 68, 70, 73, 75, 78-79, 83-84, 86, 91-93, 96, 100-103, 107, 111, 115-117, 119-120, 122-123, 126-132, 136, 138, 140, 143, 145, 146, 148, 152, 154, 157, 162, 165, 167-168, 170-174, 177-178, 180, 182, 184-185, 187, 190-197, 199-200, 203-207, 210, 212-213, 215, 217, 222-223, 225, 227-228, 231-235, 238, 240-242, 252, 256, 259, 263, 265, 270, 275, 284, 286, 288, 291, 292, 296, 299, 302, 304-305, 307-310, 312-318, 320, 322, 331-334, 336, 339 and 341 of this Report and noted that these commitments are incorporated in paragraph 1.2 of the Draft Protocol. "
This is a tool by the WTO that list all the WTO commitment of each country in the working paper. In the goods and service schedule they have commitments for particular sectors. Here is the a press release by the WTO in September 2001, after successfully concluding talks for accession, and brief summary of key areas in which China hasn't fulfilled her commitments. Most of the commitments made by China were made to address its legacy as a non-market economy and involvement of state owned enterprises. In my opinion, I think the US government and investors grew increasingly frustrated with China, after 2007 not just because of China's back sliding, but relative to other countries who joined after 1997 like Vietnam, another non-market Leninist dictatorship. When comparing China's commitments to the WTO its best to compare her progress with those that joined after 1997, which were mostly ex-Soviet Republics.
NOTE: The Chinese media have for two decades compared any time the US has talked about China's currency manipulation or any other issue as a pretext for imposing tariffs on China to the Plaza Accords. I am very sure people will raise it here. My criticism of this view is fourfold. First, the US targeted not just Japan, but France, Britain and the UK as well. Secondly, the causes of the Japan lost decade were due largely to internal factors. Thirdly, Japan, UK, Britain and France in the 1980s, the Yuan isn't undervalued today. Lastly, in the USTR investigation, its China's practices that are the concern, not so much the trade deficit.

REASONS FOR TRUMPS UNILATERAL APPROACH

I feel that people shouldn't dismiss Trump's unilateral approach toward China for several reasons.
  1. The multilateral approach won't work in many issues such as the trade deficit, commercial espionage and intellectual property, because US and her allies have different interest with regard to these issues. Germany and Japan and trade surpluses with China, while the US runs a deficit. In order to reach a consensus means the West has to compromise among themselves, and the end result if the type of toothless resolutions you commonly find in ASEAN regarding the SCS. Does America want to "compromise" its interest to appease a politician like Justin Trudeau? Not to mention opposition from domestic interest. TPP was opposed by both Clinton and Trump during the election.
  2. You can't launch a geopolitical front against China using a newly formed trade block like the TPP. Some of the existing TPP members are in economic groups with China, like Malaysia and Australia.
  3. China has joined a multitude of international bodies, and at least in trade, these bodies haven't changed its behavior.
  4. Dealing with China, its a no win situation whether you use a tough multilateral / unilateral approach. If the US endorse a tough unilateral approach gives the impression that the US is acting like the British during the Opium War. If you take a concerted Western approach you are accused of acting like the 8 Powers Alliance in 1900.
  5. Trump was elected to deal with China which he and his supporters believe was responsible for the loss of millions manufacturing jobs when China joined the WTO in 2001. It is estimate the US lost 6 Million jobs, about 1/4 of US manufacturing Jobs. This has been subsequently advanced by some economists. The ball got rolling when Bill Clinton decided to grant China Most Favored Nation status in 1999, just a decade after Tiananmen.
  6. China hasn't dealt with issues like IP protection, market access, subsidies to state own companies and state funded industrial spying.
To his credit, Trump has said his aim was not to overthrow authoritarian governments, and that even applies to the likes of Iran. The Arab spring scared Russia and China, because the US for a brief moment placed the spread of democracy over its security interest.

UNDERSTANDING HOW THE US MAKES DECISIONS REGARDING CHINA

At this moment, China or the trade war isn't an area of great concern for the American public, among international issues it ranks lower than international terrorism, North Korea and Iran's nuclear program.
According to the survey, 39 percent of the country views China’s growing power as a “critical threat” to Americans. That ranked it only eighth among 12 potential threats listed and placed China well behind the perceived threats from international terrorism (66 percent), North Korea’s nuclear program (59 percent) and Iran’s nuclear program (52 percent). It’s also considerably lower than when the same question was asked during the 1990s, when more than half of those polled listed China as a critical threat. That broadly tracks with a recent poll from the Pew Research Center that found concern about U.S.-China economic issues had decreased since 2012.
In looking at how US conducts relations foreign policy with China, we should look at it from the three areas of most concern - economic, national security and ideology. Each sphere has their interest groups, and sometimes groups can occupy two spheres at once. Security experts are concerned with some aspects of China's economic actions like IP theft and industrial policy (China 2025), because they are related to security. In these sphere there are your hawks and dove. And each sphere is dominated by certain interest groups. That is why US policy toward China can often appear contradictory. You have Trump want to reduce the trade deficit, but security experts advocating for restrictions on dual use technology who are buttressed by people who want export restrictions on China, as a way of getting market access.
Right now the economic concerns are most dominant, and the hawks seem to dominate. The economic hawks traditionally have been domestic manufacturing companies and economic nationalist. In reality the hawks aren't dominant, but the groups like US Companies with large investment in China and Wall Street are no longer defending China, and some have turned hawkish against China. These US companies are the main conduit in which China's lobby Congress, since China only spends 50% of what Taiwan spends lobbying Congress.
THE ANGLO SAXON WORLD AND CHINA
I don't think many Chinese even those that speak English, have a good understanding Anglo-Saxon society mindset. Anglo Saxons countries, whether US, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Ireland are commerce driven society governed by sanctity of contracts. The English great philosophical contributions to Western philosophy have primarily to do with economics and politics like Adam Smith, John Locke, David Hume and Thomas Hobbes. This contrast with the French and Germans. Politics in the UK and to a lesser extent the US, is centered around economics, while in Mainland Europe its religion. When the Americans revolted against the British Empire in 1776, the initial source of the grievances were taxes.
Outside of East Asia, the rest of the World's relationship with China was largely commercial, and for United States, being an Anglosaxon country, even more so. In Southeast Asia, Chinese aren't known for high culture, but for trade and commerce. Outside Vietnam, most of Chinese loans words in Southeast Asian languages involve either food or money. The influence is akin to Yiddish in English.
Some people point to the Mao and Nixon meeting as great strategic breakthrough and symbol of what great power politics should look like. The reality is that the Mao-Nixon meeting was an anomaly in the long history of relations with China and the West. Much of China-Western relations over the last 500 years was conducted by multitudes of nameless Chinese and Western traders. The period from 1949-1979 was the only period were strategic concerns triumphed trade, because China had little to offer except instability and revolution. Even in this period, China's attempt to spread revolution in Southeast Asia was a threat to Western investments and corporate interest in the region. During the nadir of both the Qing Dynasty and Republican period, China was still engaged in its traditional commercial role. Throughout much of history of their relations with China, the goals of Britain and the United States were primarily economic,
IMAGINE JUST 10% OF CHINA BOUGHT MY PRODUCT
From the beginning, the allure of China to Western businesses and traders has been its sheer size I. One of the points that the USTR mentions is lack of market access for US companies operating in China, while Chinese companies face much less restrictions operating in the US.
This is supported by remarks by Henry Paulson and Charlene Barshefsky. As Paulson remarked
Trade with China has hurt some American workers. And they have expressed their grievances at the ballot box.
So while many attribute this shift to the Trump Administration, I do not. What we are now seeing will likely endure for some time within the American policy establishment. China is viewed—by a growing consensus—not just as a strategic challenge to the United States but as a country whose rise has come at America’s expense. In this environment, it would be helpful if the US-China relationship had more advocates. That it does not reflects another failure:
In large part because China has been slow to open its economy since it joined the WTO, the American business community has turned from advocate to skeptic and even opponent of past US policies toward China. American business doesn’t want a tariff war but it does want a more aggressive approach from our government. How can it be that those who know China best, work there, do business there, make money there, and have advocated for productive relations in the past, are among those now arguing for more confrontation? The answer lies in the story of stalled competition policy, and the slow pace of opening, over nearly two decades. This has discouraged and fragmented the American business community. And it has reinforced the negative attitudinal shift among our political and expert classes. In short, even though many American businesses continue to prosper in China, a growing number of firms have given up hope that the playing field will ever be level. Some have accepted the Faustian bargain of maximizing today’s earnings per share while operating under restrictions that jeopardize their future competitiveness. But that doesn’t mean they’re happy about it. Nor does it mean they aren’t acutely aware of the risks — or thinking harder than ever before about how to diversify their risks away from, and beyond, China.
What is interesting about Paulson's speech is he spend only one sentence about displaced US workers, and a whole paragraph about US business operating in China. While Kissinger writes books about China, how much does he contribute to both Democrats and the Republicans during the election cycle? China is increasingly makING it more difficult for US companies operating and those exporting products to China.

CONTINUED

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[OC] Politicians Killing the Planet

So realestnwah posted this article to /LateStageCapitalism and it caught my eye. I decided that there has to be a reason that all of these politicians are denying climate change or the human cause of it, so what was it? Well, we already know, don’t we? So I went to OpenSecrets and I started hunting down contributions from companies who stand to lose something if the government intervenes to help stop climate change. I sorted by career contributions. This is gonna be long.
Alabama
Richard Shelby's first and third all time contributors are Southern Co., a gas and energy company, and Drummond Company, a coal mining company.
Robert Aderholt also has those two companies in his top four.
Mo Brooks seems to be clean from a energy-company-finance-backing standpoint.
Gary Palmer has Southern Co as his fourth largest donor.
Alaska
Dan Sullivan's fifth largest contributor is the Koch brothers.
Don Young's largest contributor is VECO Corporation, an oil pipeline service.
Arizona
Andy Biggs' largest donor is Club for Growth, a conservative organization that advocates against government intervention to curb greenhouse gas emissions.
Paul Gosar's third largest contributor is Pinnacle West Capital, a holding company that owns two energy companies: Arizona Public Service and Bright Canyon Energy.
Debbie Lesko's second largest contributor is Pinncale West Capital and her fifth largest is the Koch brothers.
David Schweikert has Koch Industries in his top ten and has received tens of thousands from Salt River Project, an energy firm.
Arkansas
Tom Cotton has Club for Growth has his top donor and Murphy Oil in his top eight.
John Boozman has received $29,000 from National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Rick Crawford has received $26,000 from National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Bruce Westerman has Murphy Oil at #2 and Koch Industries at #11.
Steve Womack has also been hit up by National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, for the tune of $34,500.
California (Goddammit, you're supposed to be an American bastion of progressive values. The fuck, home state?)
Duncan Hunter's top donor is General Atomics, an, among other things, energy company. Although they mainly deal in nuclear energy, so they should be pushing for renewables. Plus Duncan just denies that climate change is man-made, not that it isn't happening, so who the fuck knows.
Doug LaMalfa rakes it in from California Dairies Inc, National Cattleman's Beef Association and Pacific Gas & Electric.
Tom McClintock gets money from Occidental Petroleum, Valero Energy, Vaquero Energy and the Koch brothers.
Devin Nunes is just a piece of shit in general, but he also gets big bucks from California Dairies Inc, Edison, the Koch bros and Chevron.
Colorado
Cory Gardner gets almost six figures from Club for Growth, as well as major contributions from Anadarko Petroleum, the Koch cocks, Noble Energy, Xcel Energy and the National Cattleman's Beef Association.
Ken Buck gets bucks from Club for Growth, Kochs, Cade Oil & Gas and our old pal mother fucking Haliburton.
Doug Lamborn gets money from the Koch brothers as well as the National Mining Association and Exxon Mobil.
Scott Tipton's political tips from SG Interests, an oil and natural gas company, the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association as well as the cock tips of the Koch brothers.
Florida
Marco Rubio. Do I really need to look this one up? Yes, because he ain't special and fuck him. Well, I guess Club for Growth thinks he's special because they've given him ~$700,000. He's also received big bucks from Nextera Energy.
Info on Neal Dunn shows he gets a bunch of money from doctor's organizations and a bunch of money from beer companies. So maybe he's just hypocritical.
Bill Posey also doesn't appear to have any financial conflicts based on my admittedly shallow research.
Ted Yoho is linked to the National Cattleman's Beef Association, the Koch brothers and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
John Rutherford doesn't appear to have any direct financial conflicts concerning climate change, but he does receive funds from Prosperity Action, which is a PAC chaired by Paul Ryan, so fuck that guy. And extra fuck Paul Ryan.
Mario Diaz-Balart gets a hefty contribution from NextEra Energy.
Georgia
David Perdue gets big money from Club for Growth, Southern Co, the Koch brothers and Alliant Energy.
Richard Allen receives ~$20,000 from Southern Co.
Jody Hice has Georgia Power as a major donor, but he's also received money from a solar power corporation, although a bit more from Georgia Power.
Johnny Isakson has received six figures plus from Southern Co.
Barry Loudermilk gets big bucks from Club for Growth, Georgia Power and the Koch brothers.
Austin Scott gets large donations from Georgia Power, National Cattleman's Beef Association and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Idaho
Mike Simpson gets money from IDACORP, an electricity holding company, as well as General Atomics, Agri Beef and National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Russ Fulcher gets hooked up from Club for Growth, Agri Beef, Koch Industries and IDACORP.
Illinois
Mike Bost gets paid by Exelon Corp, an energy company, Knight Hawk Coal and Koch Industries.
Rodney Davis has backers including McDonald's (arguably holds an interest in not seeing the reduction of beef consumption), Exelon, National Cattleman's Beef Association and Exxon Mobil.
John Shimkus gets major money from Exelon, Ameren Corp, a power company and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Darin LaHood receives payments from Marquis Energy and Exelon Corp.
Indiana
Todd Young has received $86,000 from Club for Growth.
Jim Banks' largest donor is Club for Growth.
Larry Bucshon receives major donations from Vectren Corp, a large energy holding firm, as well as Koch Enterprises and Peabody Energy.
Iowa
Chuck Grassley gets a lot of money from Nextera Energy.
Joni Ernst receives contributions from Ford Motor Co and Beef Products Inc.
Steve King, this fucking racist, has received near $300,000 from Club for Growth, because of fucking course he has. Also gets a bundle from Koch Industries.
Kansas
Pat Roberts has made a lot of money from the Koch brothers as well as the National Cattleman's Beef Association.
Kentucky
The moment you've all been waiting for: Mitch McTurtle. Peabody Energy and General Electric (which is kind of a push maybe). I'm sure there's more, but I can hardly stand to even seen this reptile's name on my screen, so I stopped looking.
Rand Paul: Club for Growth (seriously fuck this organization), Murray Energy and Koch Industries.
James Comer seems cleanish, minus $12,500 from Ford Motor Co.
Thomas Massie is buddies with Club for Growth, Marathon Petroleum and Koch Industries.
Louisiana
Bill Cassidy's second largest donor is Cajun Industries, which manufacturers materials for Exxon and other oil companies, and also receives money from Koch Industries and Hise Co, an oil company headquartered in Louisiana.
Clay Higgins is new to the game but his second largest donor is Harvey Gulf, a marine transportation company that services deep-water operations in the Gulf of Mexico. Their fleet is actually full of badass looking ships with helicopter landing pads attached to the bow and shit, but their biggest clients are oil companies. He also gets money directly from Cox Oil.
Steve Scalise has Edison Chouset Offshore as his second largest donor. Like Harvey Gulf, they're also a marine transport company that caters mainly to oil companies. In fact, many politicians in the list before this have received money from them, but I neglected to add those. Scalise also gets money from Entergy Corp, Koch Industries and Cajun Industries.
Maryland
Andy Harris gets major money from Club for Growth and Koch Industries.
Michigan
Justin Amash is also a member of shittiest club around, Club for Growth. In addition he gets funds from Wolverine Gas & Oil and Koch Industries.
Bill Huizenga gets major contributions from CMS Energy and DTE Energy.
John Moolenaar also receives money from CMS Energy and DTE Energy, as well as General Motors, Ford Motor Co and our old friend National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Fred Upton has made some major bucks from Ford Motor Co, DTE Energy, CMS Energy, Energy Transfer Equity, General Motors, National Auto Dealers Association and Automotive Free International Trade PAC.
Tim Walberg: Club for Growth, CMS Energy, DTE Energy, Ford Motor Co, Koch Industries and General Motors.
Minnesota
Tom Emmer gets tens of thousands from Land O'Lakes, which might be a stretch, but they deal pretty heavily in dairy. I might be convinced to take this one off the list. Other than that he appears clean.
Collin Peterson. The only Democrat on this list, this dude is all about the farmers. Dairy Farmers of America, Associated Milk Producers, Land O'Lakes and Koch Industries.
Mississippi
Roger Wicker gets donations from Ergon Inc, a petroleum company, as well as General Atomics, Entergy Corp and Southern Co.
Cindy Hyde-Smith, of front row public hanging fame, apparently won't make statements on climate change one way or the other, but she takes money from General Atomics, Ergon Inc, National Cattleman's Beef Association and Marathon Petroleum.
Missouri
Roy Blunt gets paid by Emerson Electric, Monsanto Co, General Electric, Peabody Energy and Dairy Farmers of America.
Vicky Hartzler gets money from National Auto Dealers Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Ameren Corp and Colt Energy.
Blaine Luetkemeyer: National Auto Dealers Association, Ameren Corp and National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Jason Smith gets paid by National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Emerson Electric, Ameren Corp and National Auto Dealers Association.
Ann Wagner's donors include Peabody Energy, Emerson Electric, Ameren Corp and Monsanto Co.
Montana
Steve Daines receives donations from Koch Industries, Nance Petroleum and Cloud Peak Energy Resources.
Nebraska
Deb Fischer is hooked up by Tenaska Inc, a power company, and National Cattlemen's Beef Association.
Don Bacon receives donations from Tenaska Inc, Emerson Electric and National Cattlemen's Beef Association.
Adrian Smith's largest donor by far is Club for Growth, followed by National Cattlemen's Beef Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and National Auto Dealers Association.
Nevada
Mark Amodei gets contributions from Barrick Gold, the largest gold mining company in the world, Newmont Mining, National Mining Association and National Auto Dealers Association.
New York
Lee Zeldin gets money from Koch Industries. He's one of the handful on this list with a League of Conservation Voters score in the double digits.
North Carolina
Thom Tillis takes money from Club for Growth.
Ted Budd's largest donor by far is Club for Growth.
Virginia Foxx takes money from National Auto Dealers Association, Duke Energy and Pike Electric.
Mark Meadows takes money from Koch Industries, National Auto Dealers Association, Club for Growth and Duke Energy.
David Rouzer is backed by North Carolina Farm Bureau and National Cattlemen's Beef Association.
Mark Walker gets donations from National Auto Dealers Association.
North Dakota
Kevin Cramer is all up in that conflict money, holy shit. Energy Transfer Equity, Oasis Petroleum, Select Energy Services, MBI Energy Services, Koch Industries, Cody Oil & Gas, Marathon Oil, Lignite Energy Council, Alliance Coal, Devon Energy and National Auto Dealers Association. No wonder he hated the Paris agreement.
John Hoeven isn't much cleaner. Murray Energy, NextEra Energy, Edison Chouset Offshore, Xcel Energy, MBI Energy Services and Devon Energy.
North Dakota is one of the most beautiful states we have, too. What the fuck guys. Get your greedy shit together.
Ohio
Rob Portman seems clean financially, with one minor exception. KKR & Co invests in energy.
Steve Chabot gets paid by United Dairy Farmers and National Auto Dealers Association.
Bob Gibbs' donors include American Electric Power, Murray Energy, FirstEnergy Corp, National Auto Dealers Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Marathon Petroleum and Ohio Farm Bureau.
Bill Johnson takes money from Murray Energy, National Auto Dealers Association, American Electric Power, National Mining Association, FirstEnergy Corp, Koch Industries and Chesapeake Energy.
Warren Davidson takes from Club for Growth and National Auto Dealers Association.
Oklahoma
Probably the most famous of these deniers is Jim Inhofe. He's the guy who threw the snowball in Congress to own the libs. I wonder if he got that idea from any of these backers: Koch Industries, Murray Energy, Devon Energy, Exxon Mobil, OGE Energy or Chevron.
James Lankford's top four are Devon Energy, OGE Energy, Koch Industries and Chesapeake Energy, as well as taking money from Energy Transfer Equity, Exxon Mobil and Ward Petroleum.
Kevin Hern has been hit up by McDonald's, National Cattlemen's Beef Association, Devon Energy, NGL Energy Partners, Corterra Energy and Koch Industries.
Pennsylvania
Pat Toomey has taken in a whopping $1.2 million from Club for Growth, in addition to Exelon Corp.
Scott Perry gets paid by Club for Growth, National Auto Dealers Association, Koch Industries, Exelon Corp, FirstEnergy Corp and Shipley Energy.
Glenn Thompson takes from Kriebel Group, a natural gas company, as well as National Auto Dealers Association, FirstEnergy Corp, National Fuel Gas Co, American Refining Group and National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
South Carolina
Jeff Duncan is buddies with Club for Growth, Duke Energy, Koch Industries, Petroleum Marketers Association and Exxon Mobil.
Joe Wilson has been lobbied by National Auto Dealers Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and Scana Corp, an energy based holding corporation. Scana also appears on other contribution lists, but I'm not going backward lol.
Tennessee
Marsha Blackburn is paid by Club for Growth and Koch Industries to the tune of $200,000+.
Chuck Fleischmann, at a glance, doesn't seem to have financial motivations for saying that we should murder Al Gore by putting him on an iceberg. Maybe that's just good ol' fashioned partisanship.
Phil Roe's most obvious conflict of interest is to Eastman Chemical company, which produces plastics, among other things.
Texas (Texas by far has the most reps here. Texas really hates the Earth from some reason. What the fuck y'all?)
John Cornyn: Exxon Mobil, Valero Energy, Energy Transfer Equity and Chevron.
Ted Cruz, who is absolutely, 100% a real human person, has taken money from Club for Growth, Exxon Mobil and Murray Energy.
Jodey Arrington takes money from Texas Farm Bureau, National Auto Dealers Association, Texas Cattle Feeders Association and Westex Well Services, which gets contracts for drilling oil wells.
Kevin Brady's largest donor is Anadarko Petroleum, and he also gets money from National Auto Dealers Association, Chevron and Valero Energy
John Carter is hooked up by National Auto Dealers Association, Energy Future Holdings Corp, Texas Farm Bureau and Koch Industries.
Lance Gooden is buddies with Marathon Petroleum, National Auto Dealers Association and Nustar Energy.
Dan "Jokes Hurt My Feelings" Crenshaw. His comments don't seem to disregard man-made climate change entirely, but he has taken money from an auto dealership and General Electric, so maybe something to keep an eye on lol
Louis Gohmert puts us back on track, taking donations from Koch Industries, Martin Gas Co and Energy Future Holdings Corp.
Michael McCaul's donors include Koch Industries, Energy Future Holdings Corp, Valero Energy and some automotive organizations.
Pete Olson is beholden to Koch Industries, Valero Energy, National Auto Dealers Association, Energy Future Holdings Corp and Exxon Mobil.
John Ratcliffe: Club for Growth, Exxon Mobil and Milestone Electric.
Mac Thornberry does a gross disservice to his surname by bedding National Auto Dealers Association, General Atomics, Texas Cattle Feeders Association and General Electric.
Randy Weber loves Marathon Petroleum, Valero Energy and Exxon Mobil more than he loves the Earth.
Utah
Mike Lee's largest donor by far is Club for Growth, and he also takes money from Halliburton.
Rob Bishop has sold out to National Auto Dealers Association, EnergySolutions Inc, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, National Cattlemen's Beef Association, National Mining Association and Chevron.
Chris Stewart receives contributions from Marathon Petroleum, National Auto Dealers Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and Chevron.
Virginia
Morgan Griffith loves him some Alpha Natural Resources, a coal producer, National Auto Dealers Association, Dominion Resources, a power company, Eastman Chemical, Koch Industries, FirstEnergy Corp, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and American Electric Power.
Rob Wittman gets money from National Auto Dealers Association and Dominion Resources.
Washington
Cathy McMorris Rodgers loves getting money from Avista Corp, a natural gas company, Club for Growth, Farm Credit Council, National Auto Dealers Association and Hecla Mining.
West Virginia
Shelley Moore Capito has received major donations from National Auto Dealers Association, Arch Coal and Triana Energy.
David McKinley is as dirty as coal is: Arch Coal, First Energy Corp, Alpha Natural Resources, Patriot Coal Corp, CONSOL Energy, National Auto Dealers Association, American Electric Power, Dominion Resources and Murray Energy.
Alex Mooney is tired to National Auto Dealers Association and First Energy Corp.
Wisconsin
Ron Johnson has received over $500,000 from Club for Growth, in addition to funds from tens of thousands from Koch Industries.
Sean "It Can't Be Global Warming Because It's Cold Outside" Duffy gets money from Koch Industries and Grassland Dairy.
Mike Gallagher doesn't appear to have any financial conflicts at a glance.
Glenn Grothman has such donors as Koch Industries and Alliant Energy.
Jim Sensenbrenner's comments seem relatively sensible, whatever that's worth, but he still takes money from National Auto Dealers Association and General Electric.
Wyoming
John Barrasso thinks the US will continue to rely on fossil fuels and coal. Wonder if that has anything to do with his donors? They include Pinnacle West Capital, an energy company, Chevron, NextEra Energy, Exelon Corp, Murray Energy, Koch Industries and Exxon Mobil.
Mike "Snowfall Disproves Global Warming" Enzi takes that sweet lobby money from National Auto Dealers Association, Exxon Mobil, National Mining Association, Peabody Energy and Arch Coal.
Liz "Yes, Those Cheneys" Cheney: Halliburton (no shit) and Pinnacle West Capital.
Thanks for reading all of this. Some personal notes: this shit is seriously disgusting. It's really enraging how little it takes to buy someone off to help destroy the world. Of the 131 politicians from the article, there were only five I couldn’t find financial conflicts with. That’s 96% of these people, upon even the most cursory of glances, that have been proven to prioritize money over the health of the Earth. I can’t stress this enough: Fuck. Them.
I left off airline companies and (for the most part) chemical companies who produce plastics. I don't know why I did this and I'm not gonna go back and change it now. But if you're clicking through the links, keep that in mind, too.
I've only used the one source, but OpenSecrets is widely used by reputable sources to find campaign contribution information. They are quite transparent with their methodology on their site.
All those repeat companies are absolutely not a coincidence. These are the types of conspiracy theories that people should be worried about.
I just went with obvious companies who stand to lose something from government intervention to combat climate change. I definitely didn't look up every company that was on a rep's page. If you find additional things you think I should add, let me know.
If you catch any errors I've made or think I need to take off certain companies, let me know and we can talk about it.
Again, thanks for reading. And fucking VOTE.
submitted by BloodyJourno to climate [link] [comments]

[OC] Politicians Killing the Planet

So realestnwah posted this article to /LateStageCapitalism and it caught my eye. I decided that there has to be a reason that all of these politicians are denying climate change or the human cause of it, so what was it? Well, we already know, don’t we? So I went to OpenSecrets and I started hunting down contributions from companies who stand to lose something if the government intervenes to help stop climate change. I sorted by career contributions. This is gonna be long.
Alabama
Richard Shelby's first and third all time contributors are Southern Co., a gas and energy company, and Drummond Company, a coal mining company.
Robert Aderholt also has those two companies in his top four.
Mo Brooks seems to be clean from a energy-company-finance-backing standpoint.
Gary Palmer has Southern Co as his fourth largest donor.
Alaska
Dan Sullivan's fifth largest contributor is the Koch brothers.
Don Young's largest contributor is VECO Corporation, an oil pipeline service.
Arizona
Andy Biggs' largest donor is Club for Growth, a conservative organization that advocates against government intervention to curb greenhouse gas emissions.
Paul Gosar's third largest contributor is Pinnacle West Capital, a holding company that owns two energy companies: Arizona Public Service and Bright Canyon Energy.
Debbie Lesko's second largest contributor is Pinncale West Capital and her fifth largest is the Koch brothers.
David Schweikert has Koch Industries in his top ten and has received tens of thousands from Salt River Project, an energy firm.
Arkansas
Tom Cotton has Club for Growth has his top donor and Murphy Oil in his top eight.
John Boozman has received $29,000 from National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Rick Crawford has received $26,000 from National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Bruce Westerman has Murphy Oil at #2 and Koch Industries at #11.
Steve Womack has also been hit up by National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, for the tune of $34,500.
California (Goddammit, you're supposed to be an American bastion of progressive values. The fuck, home state?)
Duncan Hunter's top donor is General Atomics, an, among other things, energy company. Although they mainly deal in nuclear energy, so they should be pushing for renewables. Plus Duncan just denies that climate change is man-made, not that it isn't happening, so who the fuck knows.
Doug LaMalfa rakes it in from California Dairies Inc, National Cattleman's Beef Association and Pacific Gas & Electric.
Tom McClintock gets money from Occidental Petroleum, Valero Energy, Vaquero Energy and the Koch brothers.
Devin Nunes is just a piece of shit in general, but he also gets big bucks from California Dairies Inc, Edison, the Koch bros and Chevron.
Colorado
Cory Gardner gets almost six figures from Club for Growth, as well as major contributions from Anadarko Petroleum, the Koch cocks, Noble Energy, Xcel Energy and the National Cattleman's Beef Association.
Ken Buck gets bucks from Club for Growth, Kochs, Cade Oil & Gas and our old pal mother fucking Haliburton.
Doug Lamborn gets money from the Koch brothers as well as the National Mining Association and Exxon Mobil.
Scott Tipton's political tips from SG Interests, an oil and natural gas company, the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association as well as the cock tips of the Koch brothers.
Florida
Marco Rubio. Do I really need to look this one up? Yes, because he ain't special and fuck him. Well, I guess Club for Growth thinks he's special because they've given him ~$700,000. He's also received big bucks from Nextera Energy.
Info on Neal Dunn shows he gets a bunch of money from doctor's organizations and a bunch of money from beer companies. So maybe he's just hypocritical.
Bill Posey also doesn't appear to have any financial conflicts based on my admittedly shallow research.
Ted Yoho is linked to the National Cattleman's Beef Association, the Koch brothers and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
John Rutherford doesn't appear to have any direct financial conflicts concerning climate change, but he does receive funds from Prosperity Action, which is a PAC chaired by Paul Ryan, so fuck that guy. And extra fuck Paul Ryan.
Mario Diaz-Balart gets a hefty contribution from NextEra Energy.
Georgia
David Perdue gets big money from Club for Growth, Southern Co, the Koch brothers and Alliant Energy.
Richard Allen receives ~$20,000 from Southern Co.
Jody Hice has Georgia Power as a major donor, but he's also received money from a solar power corporation, although a bit more from Georgia Power.
Johnny Isakson has received six figures plus from Southern Co.
Barry Loudermilk gets big bucks from Club for Growth, Georgia Power and the Koch brothers.
Austin Scott gets large donations from Georgia Power, National Cattleman's Beef Association and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Idaho
Mike Simpson gets money from IDACORP, an electricity holding company, as well as General Atomics, Agri Beef and National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Russ Fulcher gets hooked up from Club for Growth, Agri Beef, Koch Industries and IDACORP.
Illinois
Mike Bost gets paid by Exelon Corp, an energy company, Knight Hawk Coal and Koch Industries.
Rodney Davis has backers including McDonald's (arguably holds an interest in not seeing the reduction of beef consumption), Exelon, National Cattleman's Beef Association and Exxon Mobil.
John Shimkus gets major money from Exelon, Ameren Corp, a power company and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Darin LaHood receives payments from Marquis Energy and Exelon Corp.
Indiana
Todd Young has received $86,000 from Club for Growth.
Jim Banks' largest donor is Club for Growth.
Larry Bucshon receives major donations from Vectren Corp, a large energy holding firm, as well as Koch Enterprises and Peabody Energy.
Iowa
Chuck Grassley gets a lot of money from Nextera Energy.
Joni Ernst receives contributions from Ford Motor Co and Beef Products Inc.
Steve King, this fucking racist, has received near $300,000 from Club for Growth, because of fucking course he has. Also gets a bundle from Koch Industries.
Kansas
Pat Roberts has made a lot of money from the Koch brothers as well as the National Cattleman's Beef Association.
Kentucky
The moment you've all been waiting for: Mitch McTurtle. Peabody Energy and General Electric (which is kind of a push maybe). I'm sure there's more, but I can hardly stand to even seen this reptile's name on my screen, so I stopped looking.
Rand Paul: Club for Growth (seriously fuck this organization), Murray Energy and Koch Industries.
James Comer seems cleanish, minus $12,500 from Ford Motor Co.
Thomas Massie is buddies with Club for Growth, Marathon Petroleum and Koch Industries.
Louisiana
Bill Cassidy's second largest donor is Cajun Industries, which manufacturers materials for Exxon and other oil companies, and also receives money from Koch Industries and Hise Co, an oil company headquartered in Louisiana.
Clay Higgins is new to the game but his second largest donor is Harvey Gulf, a marine transportation company that services deep-water operations in the Gulf of Mexico. Their fleet is actually full of badass looking ships with helicopter landing pads attached to the bow and shit, but their biggest clients are oil companies. He also gets money directly from Cox Oil.
Steve Scalise has Edison Chouset Offshore as his second largest donor. Like Harvey Gulf, they're also a marine transport company that caters mainly to oil companies. In fact, many politicians in the list before this have received money from them, but I neglected to add those. Scalise also gets money from Entergy Corp, Koch Industries and Cajun Industries.
Maryland
Andy Harris gets major money from Club for Growth and Koch Industries.
Michigan
Justin Amash is also a member of shittiest club around, Club for Growth. In addition he gets funds from Wolverine Gas & Oil and Koch Industries.
Bill Huizenga gets major contributions from CMS Energy and DTE Energy.
John Moolenaar also receives money from CMS Energy and DTE Energy, as well as General Motors, Ford Motor Co and our old friend National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Fred Upton has made some major bucks from Ford Motor Co, DTE Energy, CMS Energy, Energy Transfer Equity, General Motors, National Auto Dealers Association and Automotive Free International Trade PAC.
Tim Walberg: Club for Growth, CMS Energy, DTE Energy, Ford Motor Co, Koch Industries and General Motors.
Minnesota
Tom Emmer gets tens of thousands from Land O'Lakes, which might be a stretch, but they deal pretty heavily in dairy. I might be convinced to take this one off the list. Other than that he appears clean.
Collin Peterson. The only Democrat on this list, this dude is all about the farmers. Dairy Farmers of America, Associated Milk Producers, Land O'Lakes and Koch Industries.
Mississippi
Roger Wicker gets donations from Ergon Inc, a petroleum company, as well as General Atomics, Entergy Corp and Southern Co.
Cindy Hyde-Smith, of front row public hanging fame, apparently won't make statements on climate change one way or the other, but she takes money from General Atomics, Ergon Inc, National Cattleman's Beef Association and Marathon Petroleum.
Missouri
Roy Blunt gets paid by Emerson Electric, Monsanto Co, General Electric, Peabody Energy and Dairy Farmers of America.
Vicky Hartzler gets money from National Auto Dealers Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Ameren Corp and Colt Energy.
Blaine Luetkemeyer: National Auto Dealers Association, Ameren Corp and National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Jason Smith gets paid by National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Emerson Electric, Ameren Corp and National Auto Dealers Association.
Ann Wagner's donors include Peabody Energy, Emerson Electric, Ameren Corp and Monsanto Co.
Montana
Steve Daines receives donations from Koch Industries, Nance Petroleum and Cloud Peak Energy Resources.
Nebraska
Deb Fischer is hooked up by Tenaska Inc, a power company, and National Cattlemen's Beef Association.
Don Bacon receives donations from Tenaska Inc, Emerson Electric and National Cattlemen's Beef Association.
Adrian Smith's largest donor by far is Club for Growth, followed by National Cattlemen's Beef Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and National Auto Dealers Association.
Nevada
Mark Amodei gets contributions from Barrick Gold, the largest gold mining company in the world, Newmont Mining, National Mining Association and National Auto Dealers Association.
New York
Lee Zeldin gets money from Koch Industries. He's one of the handful on this list with a League of Conservation Voters score in the double digits.
North Carolina
Thom Tillis takes money from Club for Growth.
Ted Budd's largest donor by far is Club for Growth.
Virginia Foxx takes money from National Auto Dealers Association, Duke Energy and Pike Electric.
Mark Meadows takes money from Koch Industries, National Auto Dealers Association, Club for Growth and Duke Energy.
David Rouzer is backed by North Carolina Farm Bureau and National Cattlemen's Beef Association.
Mark Walker gets donations from National Auto Dealers Association.
North Dakota
Kevin Cramer is all up in that conflict money, holy shit. Energy Transfer Equity, Oasis Petroleum, Select Energy Services, MBI Energy Services, Koch Industries, Cody Oil & Gas, Marathon Oil, Lignite Energy Council, Alliance Coal, Devon Energy and National Auto Dealers Association. No wonder he hated the Paris agreement.
John Hoeven isn't much cleaner. Murray Energy, NextEra Energy, Edison Chouset Offshore, Xcel Energy, MBI Energy Services and Devon Energy.
North Dakota is one of the most beautiful states we have, too. What the fuck guys. Get your greedy shit together.
Ohio
Rob Portman seems clean financially, with one minor exception. KKR & Co invests in energy.
Steve Chabot gets paid by United Dairy Farmers and National Auto Dealers Association.
Bob Gibbs' donors include American Electric Power, Murray Energy, FirstEnergy Corp, National Auto Dealers Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Marathon Petroleum and Ohio Farm Bureau.
Bill Johnson takes money from Murray Energy, National Auto Dealers Association, American Electric Power, National Mining Association, FirstEnergy Corp, Koch Industries and Chesapeake Energy.
Warren Davidson takes from Club for Growth and National Auto Dealers Association.
Oklahoma
Probably the most famous of these deniers is Jim Inhofe. He's the guy who threw the snowball in Congress to own the libs. I wonder if he got that idea from any of these backers: Koch Industries, Murray Energy, Devon Energy, Exxon Mobil, OGE Energy or Chevron.
James Lankford's top four are Devon Energy, OGE Energy, Koch Industries and Chesapeake Energy, as well as taking money from Energy Transfer Equity, Exxon Mobil and Ward Petroleum.
Kevin Hern has been hit up by McDonald's, National Cattlemen's Beef Association, Devon Energy, NGL Energy Partners, Corterra Energy and Koch Industries.
Pennsylvania
Pat Toomey has taken in a whopping $1.2 million from Club for Growth, in addition to Exelon Corp.
Scott Perry gets paid by Club for Growth, National Auto Dealers Association, Koch Industries, Exelon Corp, FirstEnergy Corp and Shipley Energy.
Glenn Thompson takes from Kriebel Group, a natural gas company, as well as National Auto Dealers Association, FirstEnergy Corp, National Fuel Gas Co, American Refining Group and National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
South Carolina
Jeff Duncan is buddies with Club for Growth, Duke Energy, Koch Industries, Petroleum Marketers Association and Exxon Mobil.
Joe Wilson has been lobbied by National Auto Dealers Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and Scana Corp, an energy based holding corporation. Scana also appears on other contribution lists, but I'm not going backward lol.
Tennessee
Marsha Blackburn is paid by Club for Growth and Koch Industries to the tune of $200,000+.
Chuck Fleischmann, at a glance, doesn't seem to have financial motivations for saying that we should murder Al Gore by putting him on an iceberg. Maybe that's just good ol' fashioned partisanship.
Phil Roe's most obvious conflict of interest is to Eastman Chemical company, which produces plastics, among other things.
Texas (Texas by far has the most reps here. Texas really hates the Earth from some reason. What the fuck y'all?)
John Cornyn: Exxon Mobil, Valero Energy, Energy Transfer Equity and Chevron.
Ted Cruz, who is absolutely, 100% a real human person, has taken money from Club for Growth, Exxon Mobil and Murray Energy.
Jodey Arrington takes money from Texas Farm Bureau, National Auto Dealers Association, Texas Cattle Feeders Association and Westex Well Services, which gets contracts for drilling oil wells.
Kevin Brady's largest donor is Anadarko Petroleum, and he also gets money from National Auto Dealers Association, Chevron and Valero Energy
John Carter is hooked up by National Auto Dealers Association, Energy Future Holdings Corp, Texas Farm Bureau and Koch Industries.
Lance Gooden is buddies with Marathon Petroleum, National Auto Dealers Association and Nustar Energy.
Dan "Jokes Hurt My Feelings" Crenshaw. His comments don't seem to disregard man-made climate change entirely, but he has taken money from an auto dealership and General Electric, so maybe something to keep an eye on lol
Louis Gohmert puts us back on track, taking donations from Koch Industries, Martin Gas Co and Energy Future Holdings Corp.
Michael McCaul's donors include Koch Industries, Energy Future Holdings Corp, Valero Energy and some automotive organizations.
Pete Olson is beholden to Koch Industries, Valero Energy, National Auto Dealers Association, Energy Future Holdings Corp and Exxon Mobil.
John Ratcliffe: Club for Growth, Exxon Mobil and Milestone Electric.
Mac Thornberry does a gross disservice to his surname by bedding National Auto Dealers Association, General Atomics, Texas Cattle Feeders Association and General Electric.
Randy Weber loves Marathon Petroleum, Valero Energy and Exxon Mobil more than he loves the Earth.
Utah
Mike Lee's largest donor by far is Club for Growth, and he also takes money from Halliburton.
Rob Bishop has sold out to National Auto Dealers Association, EnergySolutions Inc, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, National Cattlemen's Beef Association, National Mining Association and Chevron.
Chris Stewart receives contributions from Marathon Petroleum, National Auto Dealers Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and Chevron.
Virginia
Morgan Griffith loves him some Alpha Natural Resources, a coal producer, National Auto Dealers Association, Dominion Resources, a power company, Eastman Chemical, Koch Industries, FirstEnergy Corp, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and American Electric Power.
Rob Wittman gets money from National Auto Dealers Association and Dominion Resources.
Washington
Cathy McMorris Rodgers loves getting money from Avista Corp, a natural gas company, Club for Growth, Farm Credit Council, National Auto Dealers Association and Hecla Mining.
West Virginia
Shelley Moore Capito has received major donations from National Auto Dealers Association, Arch Coal and Triana Energy.
David McKinley is as dirty as coal is: Arch Coal, First Energy Corp, Alpha Natural Resources, Patriot Coal Corp, CONSOL Energy, National Auto Dealers Association, American Electric Power, Dominion Resources and Murray Energy.
Alex Mooney is tired to National Auto Dealers Association and First Energy Corp.
Wisconsin
Ron Johnson has received over $500,000 from Club for Growth, in addition to funds from tens of thousands from Koch Industries.
Sean "It Can't Be Global Warming Because It's Cold Outside" Duffy gets money from Koch Industries and Grassland Dairy.
Mike Gallagher doesn't appear to have any financial conflicts at a glance.
Glenn Grothman has such donors as Koch Industries and Alliant Energy.
Jim Sensenbrenner's comments seem relatively sensible, whatever that's worth, but he still takes money from National Auto Dealers Association and General Electric.
Wyoming
John Barrasso thinks the US will continue to rely on fossil fuels and coal. Wonder if that has anything to do with his donors? They include Pinnacle West Capital, an energy company, Chevron, NextEra Energy, Exelon Corp, Murray Energy, Koch Industries and Exxon Mobil.
Mike "Snowfall Disproves Global Warming" Enzi takes that sweet lobby money from National Auto Dealers Association, Exxon Mobil, National Mining Association, Peabody Energy and Arch Coal.
Liz "Yes, Those Cheneys" Cheney: Halliburton (no shit) and Pinnacle West Capital.
Thanks for reading all of this. Some personal notes: this shit is seriously disgusting. It's really enraging how little it takes to buy someone off to help destroy the world. Of the 131 politicians from the article, there were only five I couldn’t find financial conflicts with. That’s 96% of these people, upon even the most cursory of glances, that have been proven to prioritize money over the health of the Earth. I can’t stress this enough: Fuck. Them.
I left off airline companies and (for the most part) chemical companies who produce plastics. I don't know why I did this and I'm not gonna go back and change it now. But if you're clicking through the links, keep that in mind, too.
I've only used the one source, but OpenSecrets is widely used by reputable sources to find campaign contribution information. They are quite transparent with their methodology on their site.
All those repeat companies are absolutely not a coincidence. These are the types of conspiracy theories that people should be worried about.
I just went with obvious companies who stand to lose something from government intervention to combat climate change. I definitely didn't look up every company that was on a rep's page. If you find additional things you think I should add, let me know.
If you catch any errors I've made or think I need to take off certain companies, let me know and we can talk about it.
Again, thanks for reading. And fucking VOTE.
submitted by BloodyJourno to LateStageCapitalism [link] [comments]

[OC] Politicians Killing the Planet

So realestnwah posted this article to /LateStageCapitalism and it caught my eye. I decided that there has to be a reason that all of these politicians are denying climate change or the human cause of it, so what was it? Well, we already know, don’t we? So I went to OpenSecrets and I started hunting down contributions from companies who stand to lose something if the government intervenes to help stop climate change. I sorted by career contributions. This is gonna be long.
Alabama
Richard Shelby's first and third all time contributors are Southern Co., a gas and energy company, and Drummond Company, a coal mining company.
Robert Aderholt also has those two companies in his top four.
Mo Brooks seems to be clean from a energy-company-finance-backing standpoint.
Gary Palmer has Southern Co as his fourth largest donor.
Alaska
Dan Sullivan's fifth largest contributor is the Koch brothers.
Don Young's largest contributor is VECO Corporation, an oil pipeline service.
Arizona
Andy Biggs' largest donor is Club for Growth, a conservative organization that advocates against government intervention to curb greenhouse gas emissions.
Paul Gosar's third largest contributor is Pinnacle West Capital, a holding company that owns two energy companies: Arizona Public Service and Bright Canyon Energy.
Debbie Lesko's second largest contributor is Pinncale West Capital and her fifth largest is the Koch brothers.
David Schweikert has Koch Industries in his top ten and has received tens of thousands from Salt River Project, an energy firm.
Arkansas
Tom Cotton has Club for Growth has his top donor and Murphy Oil in his top eight.
John Boozman has received $29,000 from National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Rick Crawford has received $26,000 from National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Bruce Westerman has Murphy Oil at #2 and Koch Industries at #11.
Steve Womack has also been hit up by National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, for the tune of $34,500.
California (Goddammit, you're supposed to be an American bastion of progressive values. The fuck, home state?)
Duncan Hunter's top donor is General Atomics, an, among other things, energy company. Although they mainly deal in nuclear energy, so they should be pushing for renewables. Plus Duncan just denies that climate change is man-made, not that it isn't happening, so who the fuck knows.
Doug LaMalfa rakes it in from California Dairies Inc, National Cattleman's Beef Association and Pacific Gas & Electric.
Tom McClintock gets money from Occidental Petroleum, Valero Energy, Vaquero Energy and the Koch brothers.
Devin Nunes is just a piece of shit in general, but he also gets big bucks from California Dairies Inc, Edison, the Koch bros and Chevron.
Colorado
Cory Gardner gets almost six figures from Club for Growth, as well as major contributions from Anadarko Petroleum, the Koch cocks, Noble Energy, Xcel Energy and the National Cattleman's Beef Association.
Ken Buck gets bucks from Club for Growth, Kochs, Cade Oil & Gas and our old pal mother fucking Haliburton.
Doug Lamborn gets money from the Koch brothers as well as the National Mining Association and Exxon Mobil.
Scott Tipton's political tips from SG Interests, an oil and natural gas company, the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association as well as the cock tips of the Koch brothers.
Florida
Marco Rubio. Do I really need to look this one up? Yes, because he ain't special and fuck him. Well, I guess Club for Growth thinks he's special because they've given him ~$700,000. He's also received big bucks from Nextera Energy.
Info on Neal Dunn shows he gets a bunch of money from doctor's organizations and a bunch of money from beer companies. So maybe he's just hypocritical.
Bill Posey also doesn't appear to have any financial conflicts based on my admittedly shallow research.
Ted Yoho is linked to the National Cattleman's Beef Association, the Koch brothers and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
John Rutherford doesn't appear to have any direct financial conflicts concerning climate change, but he does receive funds from Prosperity Action, which is a PAC chaired by Paul Ryan, so fuck that guy. And extra fuck Paul Ryan.
Mario Diaz-Balart gets a hefty contribution from NextEra Energy.
Georgia
David Perdue gets big money from Club for Growth, Southern Co, the Koch brothers and Alliant Energy.
Richard Allen receives ~$20,000 from Southern Co.
Jody Hice has Georgia Power as a major donor, but he's also received money from a solar power corporation, although a bit more from Georgia Power.
Johnny Isakson has received six figures plus from Southern Co.
Barry Loudermilk gets big bucks from Club for Growth, Georgia Power and the Koch brothers.
Austin Scott gets large donations from Georgia Power, National Cattleman's Beef Association and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Idaho
Mike Simpson gets money from IDACORP, an electricity holding company, as well as General Atomics, Agri Beef and National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Russ Fulcher gets hooked up from Club for Growth, Agri Beef, Koch Industries and IDACORP.
Illinois
Mike Bost gets paid by Exelon Corp, an energy company, Knight Hawk Coal and Koch Industries.
Rodney Davis has backers including McDonald's (arguably holds an interest in not seeing the reduction of beef consumption), Exelon, National Cattleman's Beef Association and Exxon Mobil.
John Shimkus gets major money from Exelon, Ameren Corp, a power company and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Darin LaHood receives payments from Marquis Energy and Exelon Corp.
Indiana
Todd Young has received $86,000 from Club for Growth.
Jim Banks' largest donor is Club for Growth.
Larry Bucshon receives major donations from Vectren Corp, a large energy holding firm, as well as Koch Enterprises and Peabody Energy.
Iowa
Chuck Grassley gets a lot of money from Nextera Energy.
Joni Ernst receives contributions from Ford Motor Co and Beef Products Inc.
Steve King, this fucking racist, has received near $300,000 from Club for Growth, because of fucking course he has. Also gets a bundle from Koch Industries.
Kansas
Pat Roberts has made a lot of money from the Koch brothers as well as the National Cattleman's Beef Association.
Kentucky
The moment you've all been waiting for: Mitch McTurtle. Peabody Energy and General Electric (which is kind of a push maybe). I'm sure there's more, but I can hardly stand to even seen this reptile's name on my screen, so I stopped looking.
Rand Paul: Club for Growth (seriously fuck this organization), Murray Energy and Koch Industries.
James Comer seems cleanish, minus $12,500 from Ford Motor Co.
Thomas Massie is buddies with Club for Growth, Marathon Petroleum and Koch Industries.
Louisiana
Bill Cassidy's second largest donor is Cajun Industries, which manufacturers materials for Exxon and other oil companies, and also receives money from Koch Industries and Hise Co, an oil company headquartered in Louisiana.
Clay Higgins is new to the game but his second largest donor is Harvey Gulf, a marine transportation company that services deep-water operations in the Gulf of Mexico. Their fleet is actually full of badass looking ships with helicopter landing pads attached to the bow and shit, but their biggest clients are oil companies. He also gets money directly from Cox Oil.
Steve Scalise has Edison Chouset Offshore as his second largest donor. Like Harvey Gulf, they're also a marine transport company that caters mainly to oil companies. In fact, many politicians in the list before this have received money from them, but I neglected to add those. Scalise also gets money from Entergy Corp, Koch Industries and Cajun Industries.
Maryland
Andy Harris gets major money from Club for Growth and Koch Industries.
Michigan
Justin Amash is also a member of shittiest club around, Club for Growth. In addition he gets funds from Wolverine Gas & Oil and Koch Industries.
Bill Huizenga gets major contributions from CMS Energy and DTE Energy.
John Moolenaar also receives money from CMS Energy and DTE Energy, as well as General Motors, Ford Motor Co and our old friend National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Fred Upton has made some major bucks from Ford Motor Co, DTE Energy, CMS Energy, Energy Transfer Equity, General Motors, National Auto Dealers Association and Automotive Free International Trade PAC.
Tim Walberg: Club for Growth, CMS Energy, DTE Energy, Ford Motor Co, Koch Industries and General Motors.
Minnesota
Tom Emmer gets tens of thousands from Land O'Lakes, which might be a stretch, but they deal pretty heavily in dairy. I might be convinced to take this one off the list. Other than that he appears clean.
Collin Peterson. The only Democrat on this list, this dude is all about the farmers. Dairy Farmers of America, Associated Milk Producers, Land O'Lakes and Koch Industries.
Mississippi
Roger Wicker gets donations from Ergon Inc, a petroleum company, as well as General Atomics, Entergy Corp and Southern Co.
Cindy Hyde-Smith, of front row public hanging fame, apparently won't make statements on climate change one way or the other, but she takes money from General Atomics, Ergon Inc, National Cattleman's Beef Association and Marathon Petroleum.
Missouri
Roy Blunt gets paid by Emerson Electric, Monsanto Co, General Electric, Peabody Energy and Dairy Farmers of America.
Vicky Hartzler gets money from National Auto Dealers Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Ameren Corp and Colt Energy.
Blaine Luetkemeyer: National Auto Dealers Association, Ameren Corp and National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
Jason Smith gets paid by National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Emerson Electric, Ameren Corp and National Auto Dealers Association.
Ann Wagner's donors include Peabody Energy, Emerson Electric, Ameren Corp and Monsanto Co.
Montana
Steve Daines receives donations from Koch Industries, Nance Petroleum and Cloud Peak Energy Resources.
Nebraska
Deb Fischer is hooked up by Tenaska Inc, a power company, and National Cattlemen's Beef Association.
Don Bacon receives donations from Tenaska Inc, Emerson Electric and National Cattlemen's Beef Association.
Adrian Smith's largest donor by far is Club for Growth, followed by National Cattlemen's Beef Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and National Auto Dealers Association.
Nevada
Mark Amodei gets contributions from Barrick Gold, the largest gold mining company in the world, Newmont Mining, National Mining Association and National Auto Dealers Association.
New York
Lee Zeldin gets money from Koch Industries. He's one of the handful on this list with a League of Conservation Voters score in the double digits.
North Carolina
Thom Tillis takes money from Club for Growth.
Ted Budd's largest donor by far is Club for Growth.
Virginia Foxx takes money from National Auto Dealers Association, Duke Energy and Pike Electric.
Mark Meadows takes money from Koch Industries, National Auto Dealers Association, Club for Growth and Duke Energy.
David Rouzer is backed by North Carolina Farm Bureau and National Cattlemen's Beef Association.
Mark Walker gets donations from National Auto Dealers Association.
North Dakota
Kevin Cramer is all up in that conflict money, holy shit. Energy Transfer Equity, Oasis Petroleum, Select Energy Services, MBI Energy Services, Koch Industries, Cody Oil & Gas, Marathon Oil, Lignite Energy Council, Alliance Coal, Devon Energy and National Auto Dealers Association. No wonder he hated the Paris agreement.
John Hoeven isn't much cleaner. Murray Energy, NextEra Energy, Edison Chouset Offshore, Xcel Energy, MBI Energy Services and Devon Energy.
North Dakota is one of the most beautiful states we have, too. What the fuck guys. Get your greedy shit together.
Ohio
Rob Portman seems clean financially, with one minor exception. KKR & Co invests in energy.
Steve Chabot gets paid by United Dairy Farmers and National Auto Dealers Association.
Bob Gibbs' donors include American Electric Power, Murray Energy, FirstEnergy Corp, National Auto Dealers Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Marathon Petroleum and Ohio Farm Bureau.
Bill Johnson takes money from Murray Energy, National Auto Dealers Association, American Electric Power, National Mining Association, FirstEnergy Corp, Koch Industries and Chesapeake Energy.
Warren Davidson takes from Club for Growth and National Auto Dealers Association.
Oklahoma
Probably the most famous of these deniers is Jim Inhofe. He's the guy who threw the snowball in Congress to own the libs. I wonder if he got that idea from any of these backers: Koch Industries, Murray Energy, Devon Energy, Exxon Mobil, OGE Energy or Chevron.
James Lankford's top four are Devon Energy, OGE Energy, Koch Industries and Chesapeake Energy, as well as taking money from Energy Transfer Equity, Exxon Mobil and Ward Petroleum.
Kevin Hern has been hit up by McDonald's, National Cattlemen's Beef Association, Devon Energy, NGL Energy Partners, Corterra Energy and Koch Industries.
Pennsylvania
Pat Toomey has taken in a whopping $1.2 million from Club for Growth, in addition to Exelon Corp.
Scott Perry gets paid by Club for Growth, National Auto Dealers Association, Koch Industries, Exelon Corp, FirstEnergy Corp and Shipley Energy.
Glenn Thompson takes from Kriebel Group, a natural gas company, as well as National Auto Dealers Association, FirstEnergy Corp, National Fuel Gas Co, American Refining Group and National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
South Carolina
Jeff Duncan is buddies with Club for Growth, Duke Energy, Koch Industries, Petroleum Marketers Association and Exxon Mobil.
Joe Wilson has been lobbied by National Auto Dealers Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and Scana Corp, an energy based holding corporation. Scana also appears on other contribution lists, but I'm not going backward lol.
Tennessee
Marsha Blackburn is paid by Club for Growth and Koch Industries to the tune of $200,000+.
Chuck Fleischmann, at a glance, doesn't seem to have financial motivations for saying that we should murder Al Gore by putting him on an iceberg. Maybe that's just good ol' fashioned partisanship.
Phil Roe's most obvious conflict of interest is to Eastman Chemical company, which produces plastics, among other things.
Texas (Texas by far has the most reps here. Texas really hates the Earth from some reason. What the fuck y'all?)
John Cornyn: Exxon Mobil, Valero Energy, Energy Transfer Equity and Chevron.
Ted Cruz, who is absolutely, 100% a real human person, has taken money from Club for Growth, Exxon Mobil and Murray Energy.
Jodey Arrington takes money from Texas Farm Bureau, National Auto Dealers Association, Texas Cattle Feeders Association and Westex Well Services, which gets contracts for drilling oil wells.
Kevin Brady's largest donor is Anadarko Petroleum, and he also gets money from National Auto Dealers Association, Chevron and Valero Energy
John Carter is hooked up by National Auto Dealers Association, Energy Future Holdings Corp, Texas Farm Bureau and Koch Industries.
Lance Gooden is buddies with Marathon Petroleum, National Auto Dealers Association and Nustar Energy.
Dan "Jokes Hurt My Feelings" Crenshaw. His comments don't seem to disregard man-made climate change entirely, but he has taken money from an auto dealership and General Electric, so maybe something to keep an eye on lol
Louis Gohmert puts us back on track, taking donations from Koch Industries, Martin Gas Co and Energy Future Holdings Corp.
Michael McCaul's donors include Koch Industries, Energy Future Holdings Corp, Valero Energy and some automotive organizations.
Pete Olson is beholden to Koch Industries, Valero Energy, National Auto Dealers Association, Energy Future Holdings Corp and Exxon Mobil.
John Ratcliffe: Club for Growth, Exxon Mobil and Milestone Electric.
Mac Thornberry does a gross disservice to his surname by bedding National Auto Dealers Association, General Atomics, Texas Cattle Feeders Association and General Electric.
Randy Weber loves Marathon Petroleum, Valero Energy and Exxon Mobil more than he loves the Earth.
Utah
Mike Lee's largest donor by far is Club for Growth, and he also takes money from Halliburton.
Rob Bishop has sold out to National Auto Dealers Association, EnergySolutions Inc, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, National Cattlemen's Beef Association, National Mining Association and Chevron.
Chris Stewart receives contributions from Marathon Petroleum, National Auto Dealers Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and Chevron.
Virginia
Morgan Griffith loves him some Alpha Natural Resources, a coal producer, National Auto Dealers Association, Dominion Resources, a power company, Eastman Chemical, Koch Industries, FirstEnergy Corp, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and American Electric Power.
Rob Wittman gets money from National Auto Dealers Association and Dominion Resources.
Washington
Cathy McMorris Rodgers loves getting money from Avista Corp, a natural gas company, Club for Growth, Farm Credit Council, National Auto Dealers Association and Hecla Mining.
West Virginia
Shelley Moore Capito has received major donations from National Auto Dealers Association, Arch Coal and Triana Energy.
David McKinley is as dirty as coal is: Arch Coal, First Energy Corp, Alpha Natural Resources, Patriot Coal Corp, CONSOL Energy, National Auto Dealers Association, American Electric Power, Dominion Resources and Murray Energy.
Alex Mooney is tired to National Auto Dealers Association and First Energy Corp.
Wisconsin
Ron Johnson has received over $500,000 from Club for Growth, in addition to funds from tens of thousands from Koch Industries.
Sean "It Can't Be Global Warming Because It's Cold Outside" Duffy gets money from Koch Industries and Grassland Dairy.
Mike Gallagher doesn't appear to have any financial conflicts at a glance.
Glenn Grothman has such donors as Koch Industries and Alliant Energy.
Jim Sensenbrenner's comments seem relatively sensible, whatever that's worth, but he still takes money from National Auto Dealers Association and General Electric.
Wyoming
John Barrasso thinks the US will continue to rely on fossil fuels and coal. Wonder if that has anything to do with his donors? They include Pinnacle West Capital, an energy company, Chevron, NextEra Energy, Exelon Corp, Murray Energy, Koch Industries and Exxon Mobil.
Mike "Snowfall Disproves Global Warming" Enzi takes that sweet lobby money from National Auto Dealers Association, Exxon Mobil, National Mining Association, Peabody Energy and Arch Coal.
Liz "Yes, Those Cheneys" Cheney: Halliburton (no shit) and Pinnacle West Capital.
Thanks for reading all of this. Some personal notes: this shit is seriously disgusting. It's really enraging how little it takes to buy someone off to help destroy the world. Of the 131 politicians from the article, there were only five I couldn’t find financial conflicts with. That’s 96% of these people, upon even the most cursory of glances, that have been proven to prioritize money over the health of the Earth. I can’t stress this enough: Fuck. Them.
I left off airline companies and (for the most part) chemical companies who produce plastics. I don't know why I did this and I'm not gonna go back and change it now. But if you're clicking through the links, keep that in mind, too.
I've only used the one source, but OpenSecrets is widely used by reputable sources to find campaign contribution information. They are quite transparent with their methodology on their site.
All those repeat companies are absolutely not a coincidence. These are the types of conspiracy theories that people should be worried about.
I just went with obvious companies who stand to lose something from government intervention to combat climate change. I definitely didn't look up every company that was on a rep's page. If you find additional things you think I should add, let me know.
If you catch any errors I've made or think I need to take off certain companies, let me know and we can talk about it.
Again, thanks for reading. And fucking VOTE.
submitted by BloodyJourno to environment [link] [comments]

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Compression John Pound & Karen Sullivan San Diego Comic Con 2019 Morning True North Options Analytics in CQG Integrated Client

Browse our inventory of vehicles for sale at Sullivan Auto Trading. Browse our inventory of vehicles for sale at Sullivan Auto Trading. Skip to main content. Sales: 540-371-9877; Service: (540) 654-5200; 95 S. Gateway Dr Directions Fredericksburg, VA 22406. ... Power Windows w/Front Auto Up/Down, ... 48 reviews of Sullivan Auto Trading "4 stars for customer service. I was in a bind and needed a car ASAP. I drove from Manassas, VA down to Sullivan Auto because a friend recommended this place. I looked everywhere here in Manassas and only found POS cars. When I went here I found a car on the lot that I loved and was ready to make a deal when the owner of Sullivan came over and asked me some ... Read reviews by dealership customers, get a map and directions, contact the dealer, view inventory, hours of operation, and dealership photos and video. Learn about Sullivan Auto Trading Inc. in ... Sullivan Auto Trading Inc. Fredericksburg, VA Reviews & Cars for Sale. 95 S Gateway Dr Fredericksburg, VA 22406 It took several inquiries to get my questions answered, just kept getting a copy of the listing. Then the contact answered my questions, and I indicated I was coming up the following day to see the truck.

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CQG Product Specialist Gene O'Sullivan walks you through the options functionality in CQG Integrated Client, from basic to advanced levels. ... Auto Trading with CQG - Duration: 38:40. CQG, Inc ... The King Of Trading · Brian Tyler · John Carey · Brian Tyler & John Carey Escape Room (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) ℗ 2019 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc., under exclusive Sony ... Take a nearly two hour ride from Gladstone, NJ to Hoboken, NJ in just under two minutes. See the world along the Gladstone Line from the head end of a train in the middle of the night. Camera and ... ℗ 2019 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc., under exclusive Sony Music Entertainment Released on: 2019-01-04 Associated Performer, Composer: Brian Tyler & John Carey Provided to YouTube by Sony Music Entertainment Morning · Joseph Trapanese Arctic (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) ℗ & © 2018 Arctic The Movie, LLC under...

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